Become a water guardian with Colin’s Hope to prevent drownings

Morgan Shirley, 7, leaps into Mabel Davis Pool in July.
Shelby Tauber / AMERICAN-STATESMAN
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Morgan Shirley, 7, leaps into Mabel Davis Pool in July. Shelby Tauber / AMERICAN-STATESMAN

Colin’s Hope, an Austin-based nonprofit that focuses on drowning prevention, has teamed up with daycares to give more than 14,000 sater

Morgan Shirley, 7, leaps into Mabel Davis Pool in July. Shelby Tauber / AMERICAN-STATESMAN

Morgan Shirley, 7, leaps into Mabel Davis Pool in July.
Shelby Tauber / AMERICAN-STATESMAN

guardian cards to the parents of kids in day cares around Texas. What’s a Water Guardian? It’s the adult that is watching the water to protect kids and fellow adults from drowning. It’s the adult that is specifically for the group of people you brought with you that is in addition to the lifeguard. It’s the adult that is NOT on their phone or reading a book while their kids play at the pool.

You can take the Water Guardian Quiz and add your name to the Water Guardian Wall on colinshope.org

Colin’s Hope offers these water safety tips:

Inside the house:

  • Never leave small children alone near any container of water.
  • Keep bathroom doors closed and secure toilet lids with lid locks.
  • Never leave a baby alone in a bath for any reason. Get what you need before running water, and take the child with you if you must leave the room.
  • Warn babysitters or caregivers about the dangers of water and emphasize the need to constantly supervise young children.
  • Make sure small children cannot leave the house through pet doors or unlocked doors to reach pools or hot tubs.

Outside the house:

  • Never leave children alone around water whether it is in a pool, wading pool, drainage ditch, creek, pond, or lake.
  • Constantly watch children who are swimming or playing in water. They need an adult or certified lifeguard watching and within reach.
  • Secure access to swimming pools with fences, self-closing and latching gates, and water surface alarms.
  • Completely remove the pool cover when the pool is in use.
  • Store and secure water toys away from the water when not in use, so they don’t attract a small child.
  • Don’t assume young children will use good judgment around water.
  • Be ready for emergencies. Keep emergency telephone numbers handy and learn CPR.
  • Find out if your child’s friends or neighbors have pools.

 

Find more drowning tips:

Ready for a summer of fun in the water? Olympic swimmers give their swim safety advice

Raising Austin: Water Safety guide

You can help more kids learn to swim

Since 2000, the Austin American-Statesman has tried to improve local children’s chances at being swim safer. Our Swim Safe program raises money to provide swimming lessons to families that would not be able to afford them. You can find out more or make a donation, at community.statesman.com/swim_safe.php


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